Proposed Sales Tax Increase Continues One Bad Option After Another

Conservative job-creator and 10th district Congressional candidate Paul Mitchell blasted a proposed State Senate resolution to support increasing the current state sales tax from 6% to 7% to fund roads and infrastructure. Senate Joint Resolution M (SJR M) was introduced last month and proponents cited the purpose of the resolution to raise the sales tax was out of concern that the recent tax increases would not raise enough revenue to support other government spending.  Just like the failed Proposal 1 of May 2015 that was rejected by voters 80%-20%, Senate Joint Resolution M would propose a constitutional amendment to raise the state sales tax from 6% to 7%.

“I simply can’t understand what these members of the State Senate are thinking in proposing even higher taxes.  When the legislature failed to produce a viable solution to fix our roads and punted their responsibility to the voters by proposing the largest tax increase in Michigan in the last 50 years it was rejected by the largest margin in modern Michigan election history.  Career politicians, like those backing Senate Joint Resolution M, who continue to propose one bad tax idea after another clearly aren’t getting the message that government needs to live within its means,” stated Paul Mitchell.  “The perpetual gas tax increase and massive vehicle registration increases passed last fall were bad ideas and the proposed increase in the sales tax is another bad idea. The voters are demanding that we fix the roads without massive tax increases, and instead we must prioritize current state spending to get the job done.  But the politicians just can’t stop their insatiable desire to spend.  We elected a Republican super majority to the legislature based upon the promise that they would enact conservative solutions to our state’s challenges, but what we get is more taxes and more spending.  The citizens are demanding and deserve better.”

Last year, Paul Mitchell led the coalition group, Say No to Higher Taxes and Special Interest Deals, which helped defeat Proposal 1 by a margin of 80%-20%.  Proposal 1 was a proposed constitutional amendment which would have raised the sales tax from 6% to 7%.

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